Greatest Westerns: 3.10 To Yuma The Man From Laramie ...

  |  Book Tickets: 09/11/1973
  |  Buy to Own: 02/06/2008
  |  Watch Now: 20/07/2009
  |  610 min
Rated 15 by the BBFC


Set of six classic westerns. In '3:10 to Yuma' (1957), hard-up rancher Dan Evans (Van Heflin) is holding ruthless outlaw Ben Wade (Glenn Ford) at gunpoint, waiting for a train to Yuma where the authorities have put up a $200 reward. However, Wade offers him $10,000 to set him free; the bounty will ease his financial difficulties, but Wade's offer will set him up for life. Thus begins a cat-and-mouse wait for the 3:10 train with Evans' wife pleading for him to take the money and save himself and Wade's gang attempting to free their leader. In 'The Man from Laramie' (1955), James Stewart plays a vengeful cow-herder who arrives in New Mexico determined to find the man who was responsible for the killing of his brother. His brother was shot down by Apaches armed with automatic rifles, and Stewart is looking for the man who sold them to the Indians. Following 'Winchester 73', 'Bend in the River', 'The Naked Spur' and 'The Far Country', this was the last of the five classic westerns Stewart made with director Anthony Mann. In 'High Plains Drifter' (1973), the unwelcome arrival of a stranger (Clint Eastwood) in the town of Lagos causes resentment and fear among the locals. However, when they come under threat from a band of escaped convicts, it is to the stranger that the townsfolk turn for salvation. He agrees to help, and sets about teaching the populace the arts of self defence; but there's something more to the stranger than first meets the eye. 'Shenandoah' (1965) is a civil war drama set in 1863, starring James Stewart as Charlie Anderson, a wealthy farmer in Virginia who has hitherto steadfastly refused to take any part in the war that is raging around him. But the war inevitably ensnares him through a series of family tragedies that includes his youngest son (Philip Alford) being taken prisoner by the Unionists and charged with spying, his son James (Patrick Wayne) and daughter-in-law Ann (Katharine Ross) being murdered by a gang of looters, and the death of his eldest son Jacob (Glenn Corbett). Meanwhile his daughter, Jannie (Rosemary Forsyth) falls in love with a Confederate soldier, Sam (Doug McClure). In director John Ford's classic 'Stagecoach' (1939), Geronimo is on the warpath in the untamed Wild West, but a stagecoach-load of travellers decide to take their chances and make their way across Utah's Monument Valley. The passenger list comprises an alcoholic doctor (Thomas Mitchell), a shamed prostitute (Claire Trevor), the pregnant wife of a cavalry officer (Louise Platt), a shady bank manager (Berton Churchill), a timid whiskey salesman (Donald Meek) and an on-the-run gambler (John Carradine). En route, they pick up outlaw the Ringo Kid (John Wayne) and, as the journey continues, each of the troupe are given a chance to show their true colours. This is the film that made a star out of Wayne. Finally, in 'Fort Apache' (1948), Colonel Thursday (Henry Fonda) is bitter at having been sent to battle 'digger' Indians, and his textbook methods of warfare appear barbaric and suicidal to his men. Captain York (Wayne), an officer experienced in Apache warfare, tries to advise Thursday, but his best efforts are in vain. This was the first film in Ford's cavalry trilogy, followed by 'She Wore a Yellow Ribbon' (1949) and 'Rio Grande' (1950).

Contains strong sexualised nudity and moderate sex
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