British Film Comedy: The Saucy 70s

1976
  |  Buy to Own: 29/10/2018
  |  361 min
Rated TBC by the BBFC

Synopsis

Collection of 1970s adult comedies. In 'Not Now Comrade' (1976) Russian ballet dancer Rudi Petrovyan (Lewis Fiander) decides to cross the Iron Curtain and defect. However, on arrival in Britain Rudi appears to be having second thoughts, leaving him and the authorities in a somewhat awkward position. How will London stripper Barbara (Carol Hawkins), and everyone else he comes into contact with, deal with the inevitable cultural confusion that occurs as Rudi endeavours to adapt to life in the West? In 'Every Home Should Have One' (1970) Marty Feldman stars as Teddy, who works in television advertising. His boss gives him a new project - to come up with a sexy image for frozen porridge and to advertise it in commercial breaks. His task at work comes into conflict with his home life as his wife Liz (Judy Cornwell) is in charge of the 'Keep Television Clean' campaign and takes issue with Teddy's plans to find an attractive Goldilocks. In 'Keep It Up Downstairs' (1976) the film follows life among a bawdy and almost bankrupt aristocratic family and their servants. With the late night shenanigans of servants including butler Hampton (Neil Hallett) exemplifying the state of disarray that has led their family to the verge of financial oblivion, Lord and Lady Cockshute (Mark Singleton and Sue Longhurst) decide that a wealthy match must be found for their eccentric son Peregrine (Jack Wild) to alleviate their plight. However, Peregrine, an inventor attuned to the problems of the house, has another solution in mind. Finally, in 'All the Way Up' (1970), having started out with little to his name, salesman Fred Midway (Warren Mitchell) is determined to climb the social ladder by any means necessary. If this involves accusing a promotion rival of having an affair with his boss's wife then Fred is happy to do so. Aware that a man can only rise so far if his family match his ambitions, the rest of the Midways - Hilda (Pat Heywood), Eileen (Elaine Taylor) and Tom (Kenneth Cranham) - are implored by Fred to put on a show of sophistication. However, he may well come to regret educating his son Tom in the art of falsehood. For when Fred strikes upon his most devious scheme yet, Tom wants a piece of the action - and is prepared to blackmail his own father to get it.